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I'm Miguel
18
I re-blog science (Space Science to be exact) and the occasional fandom blogs from my friends and autistic blogs since I am autistic. I also write Science Fiction stories as well, though none of them have been published.

gothgirlsgettingmoney:

My least favorite thing is straight men who come into lush and act like it’s a direct attack on their manhood coming up to me like “I’m in here for my girlfriend” ok thanks for confirming your heterosexuality everyone who likes soap is usually gay

(Source: gendertrashfromhell, via angelic-pooper)

— 36 minutes ago with 60355 notes

madelinelime:

When I was a kid I thought your 20s were supposed to be fun, not filled with perpetual anxiety about financial stability and constantly feeling like an unaccomplished piece of shit. 

That’s because it was fun for baby boomers and they basically gave us this impression it would always be like that, but then they ruined the economy.

(Source: curseofthefanartlords, via angelic-pooper)

— 36 minutes ago with 158290 notes

korratic:

"airbenders are able to warm themselves with only their breathing"

ok so this explains why katara and sokka were bundled up in parkas galore while aang was just walking around in his little jump suit like it was a perfect summer evening. I’m so glad this was cleared up. I literally thought Aang’s optimistic attitude is what kept him warm, heavens. 

(via angelic-pooper)

— 36 minutes ago with 41992 notes

rtamerica:

US concerned over use of Russian rockets

(via spaceexp)

— 58 minutes ago with 43 notes

bigbardafree:

people who complain that pluto isnt considered one of our major planets anymore make me think of people in the 1500s being like “REMEMBER WHEN THE SUN USED TO REVOLVE AROUND THE EARTH WHY DOES SCIENCE HAVE TO RUIN EVERYTHING”

(via space-tart)

— 58 minutes ago with 8092 notes

50 Questions You've Never Been Asked

Ask me a couple of numbers!!
1. What's your favorite candle scent?
2. What female celebrity do you wish was your sister?
3. What male celebrity do you wish was your brother?
4. How old do you think you'll be when you get married?
5. Do you know a hoarder?
6. Can you do a split?
7. How old were you when you learned how to ride a bike?
8. How many oceans have you swam in?
9. How many countries have you been to?
10. Is anyone in your family in the army?
11. What would you name your daughter if you had one?
12. What would you name your son if you had one?
13. What's the worst grade you got on a test?
14. What was your favorite TV show when you were a child?
15. What did you dress up as on Halloween when you were eight?
16. Have you read any of the Harry Potter, Hunger Games or Twilight series?
17. Would you rather have an American accent or a British accent?
18. Did your mother go to college?
19. Are your grandparents still married?
20. Have you ever taken karate lessons?
21. Do you know who Kermit the frog is?
22. What's the first amusement park you've been to?
23. What language, besides your native language, would you like to be fluent in?
24. Do you spell the color as grey or gray?
25. Is your father bald?
26. Do you know triplets?
27. Do you prefer Titanic or The Notebook?
28. Have you ever had Indian food?
29. What's the name of your favorite restaurant?
30. Have you ever been to Olive Garden?
31. Do you belong to any warehouse stores (Costco, BJ's, etc.)?
32. What would your parents have named you if you were the opposite gender?
33. If you have a nickname, what is it?
34. Who's your favorite person in the world?
35. Would you rather live in a rural area or in the suburbs?
36. Can you whistle?
37. Do you sleep with a nightlight?
38. Do you eat breakfast every morning?
39. Do you take any pills or medication daily?
40. What medical conditions do you have?
41. How many times have you been to the hospital?
42. Have you ever seen Finding Nemo?
43. Where do you buy your jeans?
44. What's the last compliment you got?
45. Do you usually remember your dreams in the morning?
46. What flavor tea do you enjoy?
47. How many pairs of shoes do you currently own?
48. What religion will you raise your children to practice?
49. How old were you when you found out that Santa wasn't real?
50. Why do you have a tumblr?
— 58 minutes ago with 406435 notes

lightthiscandle:

"I believe this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is about, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the earth."—President John F. Kennedy, May 25, 1961

(Source: justgirlythings, via space-tart)

— 58 minutes ago with 29 notes
libutron:

Blue-ringed octopus: a beauty to look at but don’t touch
Blue-Ringed octopuses are very small organisms, belonging to the genus Hapalochlaena (Cephalopoda - Octopodidae). They are the size of a golf ball but its venom is powerful enough to kill an adult human in minutes. The bite might be painless, but this octopus secrets a neuromuscular paralyzing venom. 
The venom is not injected but is contained in the octopus’s saliva, which comes from two glands each as big as its brain. The venom contains some maculotoxin, a substance more violent than any found on land animals. This substance blocks the nerve conduction and causes neuromuscular paralysis, followed by death. The venom also contains tetrodotoxin, which blocks sodium channels and causes motor paralysis and occasionally respiratory failure. Though with fixed dilated pupils, the senses of the victims are often intact, they are aware but unable to respond.
There’s no known antidote, but the victim might be saved if artificial respiration starts before marked cyanosis and hypotension develops. The only treatment is hours of heart massage and artificial respiration until the toxin has worked its way out of your system.
Some symptoms that may be experienced when the toxin enters the system are: onset of nausea, hazy vision (within seconds you are blind), loss of sense of touch, speech and the ability to swallow.  
Although the painless bite can kill an adult, injuries have only occurred when an octopus has been picked out of its pool and provoked or stepped on. So be careful in the Australian beaches, and, please, don’t touch this cute octopus.
Blue-Ringed Octopus Bite First Aid: 
1.- This bite is considered a medical emergency so do not wait for symptoms to develop; quickly get the person bitten out of the water and, if possible, call the emergency number and consider transport to the nearest hospital.
2.- Use the pressure immobilization technique: wrap the limb with an elastic bandage. It should be tight, but the fingers and toes should remain pink so that the circulation is not cut off. The extremity should also be immobilized  with a splint or stick of some sort. The elastic bandage should be removed for 90 seconds every 10 minutes and then reapplied for the first 4 to 6 hours (hopefully medical care can be received within this time period). If 30 minutes or more has passed since the blue-octopus bite, the pressure immobilization technique is not likely to be helpful.
3.- If the victim is having difficulty breathing, assist with mouth-to-mouth ventilation. 
When a victim is kept alive the poison gradually wears off after 24h, apparently leaving no side effects.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Bjørn Christian Tørrissen | Locality: Sidney, Australia

libutron:

Blue-ringed octopus: a beauty to look at but don’t touch

Blue-Ringed octopuses are very small organisms, belonging to the genus Hapalochlaena (Cephalopoda - Octopodidae). They are the size of a golf ball but its venom is powerful enough to kill an adult human in minutesThe bite might be painless, but this octopus secrets a neuromuscular paralyzing venom

The venom is not injected but is contained in the octopus’s saliva, which comes from two glands each as big as its brain. The venom contains some maculotoxin, a substance more violent than any found on land animals. This substance blocks the nerve conduction and causes neuromuscular paralysis, followed by death. The venom also contains tetrodotoxin, which blocks sodium channels and causes motor paralysis and occasionally respiratory failure. Though with fixed dilated pupils, the senses of the victims are often intact, they are aware but unable to respond.

There’s no known antidote, but the victim might be saved if artificial respiration starts before marked cyanosis and hypotension develops. The only treatment is hours of heart massage and artificial respiration until the toxin has worked its way out of your system.

Some symptoms that may be experienced when the toxin enters the system are: onset of nausea, hazy vision (within seconds you are blind), loss of sense of touch, speech and the ability to swallow.  

Although the painless bite can kill an adult, injuries have only occurred when an octopus has been picked out of its pool and provoked or stepped on. So be careful in the Australian beaches, and, please, don’t touch this cute octopus.

Blue-Ringed Octopus Bite First Aid: 

1.- This bite is considered a medical emergency so do not wait for symptoms to develop; quickly get the person bitten out of the water and, if possible, call the emergency number and consider transport to the nearest hospital.

2.- Use the pressure immobilization technique: wrap the limb with an elastic bandage. It should be tight, but the fingers and toes should remain pink so that the circulation is not cut off. The extremity should also be immobilized  with a splint or stick of some sort. The elastic bandage should be removed for 90 seconds every 10 minutes and then reapplied for the first 4 to 6 hours (hopefully medical care can be received within this time period). If 30 minutes or more has passed since the blue-octopus bite, the pressure immobilization technique is not likely to be helpful.

3.- If the victim is having difficulty breathing, assist with mouth-to-mouth ventilation. 

When a victim is kept alive the poison gradually wears off after 24h, apparently leaving no side effects.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Bjørn Christian Tørrissen | Locality: Sidney, Australia

(via we-are-star-stuff)

— 1 hour ago with 290 notes